desire-vogue:

Imam Mosque, formerly known as Shah Mosque is a mosque in Isfahan, Iran standing in south side of Naghsh-i Jahan Square.

desire-vogue:

Imam Mosque, formerly known as Shah Mosque is a mosque in Isfahan, Iran standing in south side of Naghsh-i Jahan Square.

Via with 351 notes

that-punjabi-girl-next-door:

Indian food is either hella spicy or hella sweet there is no in between

Via with 176 notes

bitchouttahell:

shout out to all of the custodians, cooks, garbage truck drivers, cafeteria workers, bus drivers, waiters, and every one else whose jobs and entire fucking existences get shit on by the same people who wouldn’t know what to do with their lives if they had to do anything for themselves

  • brown parents: I let you go out once 4 years ago!!! isn't that enough for you?!?!
  • Via with 941 notes
    singh1699:

Panga pe gya

    singh1699:

    Panga pe gya

    pikanyechu:

    is Zoe Saldana the only woc people know or what

    Via with 7 notes

    qalbee:

    fuckyeahplussizealternatives:

    toomanyfandomssolittletime:

    maahammy:

    jadethemerman:

    July 28th, 2014: Out and about in New York City

    How problematic

    im gonna fuckin throw up

    Okay, okay calm down, people.

    While you are all losing your mind over ‘cultural appropriation” of an Indian dress, nobody actually consulted THE INDIANS. 

    In our country, if a foreigner wears an Indian saree, we actually appreciate it. It shows that the foreigner respects us enough to try our clothes. And the saree, mind you, is not a religious thing. Hindus can wear sarees, Muslims can wear sarees, Sikh’s can wear sarees, Jain’s can wear sarees and so on.

    Like Americans have short dresses, compare that with sarees. Going to a party? Saree. Going to temple? Saree, and so on.

    Some Indians wear it, some don’t. Some hate it and think its oppressing, some love embracing the unique style.

    Point is, don’t hate on her for wearing this. Don’t hate on anyone for wearing sarees or any variations of sarees. We love to see others embracing our culture. Why do you think we open our gates to allow everyone to practice yoga and fins spiritual meaning?

    Culture is not meant to be kept within four walls, it should be spread.

    I did not know this. That is really interesting to find out. Thanks for the information.

    Except it’s still appropriation, in my opinion. She will still be seen as the white woman who got all ~*exotic*~ by wearing South Asian-esque clothing, but if a South Asian wears a REAL sari and puts a bindi on or headpiece like that, they are isolated for being foreign and traditional, and overall it still becomes a problem for South Asians in the Western world because they have a system of oppression working against them.

    Also, she’s not even wearing a proper sari. I mean i guess the top could pass off as a sari blouse but she’s wearing a shalwar/salwar which should be worn underneath a kameez, not a sari. If some South Asian designer designed this for a South Asian woman to wear as some new fashion trend then sure, but a white woman who has nothing to do with South Asia?? And the jewelry she’s wearing is not worn by south asian women for everyday purposes. It more appropriate for a wedding. So even if she was ‘appreciating our culture’, she’s doing it wrong. And this is Lady Gaga we’re talking about, she doesn’t care about us South Asians. She just wants to look trendy and cool.

    "that’s my cousin."
    - Usually said for a person that is not your cousin, but is like family, or considered relative. May also genuinely just be a cousin (via blackproverbs)
    bohemianhomes:

Bohemian Homes;’ Bohemian Interior with Sitar

    bohemianhomes:

    Bohemian Homes;’ Bohemian Interior with Sitar

    crenelate:

    when you look into the mirror after a day at school

    image

    anus:

    being ugly is like playing life on hard mode

    cerebralzero:

    We need more Ahmad Shah Massouds in this world and less Barack obamas.

    Via with 97 notes

    Manish Malhotra

    filed under: fashion
    Via with 252 notes
    art-and-things-of-beauty:

Leopold Carl Müller (Austrian 1834-1892)
A street scene, Cairo. Oil on panel, 92 x 66,3 cm. 1880.

    art-and-things-of-beauty:

    Leopold Carl Müller (Austrian 1834-1892)

    A street scene, Cairo. Oil on panel, 92 x 66,3 cm. 1880.

    filed under: art
    Via with 58 notes

    khatmal:

    british desi culture scares me with their same haircut 

    Via with 41 notes